What caused the TCS Concordia's destruction

What caused the TCS Concordia's destruction

  • surprise attack by Strakha fighters

    Votes: 7 30.4%
  • Skipper missiles

    Votes: 2 8.7%
  • Shok'lars attack

    Votes: 1 4.3%
  • Battle damage plus old age

    Votes: 10 43.5%
  • Other (please state)

    Votes: 3 13.0%

  • Total voters
    23
  • Poll closed .

AD

Finder of things, Doer of stuff
Nope I dont think Plywood and I ever mention anything regarding the use of the Kilrathi Cloaked Fighters.
Should there be?
Although it was the "probable" cause for the lost of the TCS Tiger's Claw althought everyone believe that Blair was crapping on about it.
I believe having the Concordia taken out by a squadron of stealth bombers did not sound appropiate
I felt that the Concordia would be one of those ships that deserve to go down with glory and honour.

The Concordia is listed as being among ships in which somehow a cloak of some sort was involved in it's demise. (Check out star*soldier). Bare in mind that by WC3 Strakha fighters are pretty common, or at least it seemed that way in WC3.
 

Dahan

Rear Admiral
The Concordia is listed as being among ships in which somehow a cloak of some sort was involved in it's demise. (Check out star*soldier). Bare in mind that by WC3 Strakha fighters are pretty common, or at least it seemed that way in WC3.

Yeap that is true
Although bear in mind that the fan fiction we wrote was purely not intentional of any conflict of any of the core information of the wing commander univserse.
If I remember Plywood and I wrote this fiction for the 10th or was it the 15th year anniversy of wing commander and I wanted to do something to support this incredible game
>_<
 

Dahan

Rear Admiral
I wonder how many times this thread will loop.

I guess its a never ending story Loaf, I think every blue moon or so the topic will come back and gets people together talk about it.
I suppose it is one of many reasons why this large community is keeping wing commander alive..
 

Bandit LOAF

Long Live the Confederation!
I guess its a never ending story Loaf, I think every blue moon or so the topic will come back and gets people together talk about it.
I suppose it is one of many reasons why this large community is keeping wing commander alive..

I was referring to the fact that we've explained the cloaking reference in this same thread.
 

DangerousCook

Rear Admiral
Has anyone said how they work? in the movie you had to drop your shields to fire, but later you didn't have to...

What's the word on that one?

Maybe they wanted a clever way for Paladin to take out a cap ship without taking up screen time to explain the concepts of shielding technology...
 

Mekt-Hakkikt

Mpanty's bane
I have to say, I am pretty surprised that the reason we can only guess gets as many votes than the reason we know to be true. :)
 

Quarto

Unknown Enemy
Technically, all four options can be true, and the option that won is the one we know to be true. Skippers, Shok'lar and Strakha all use a cloaking device... and no matter what cloaked fighter or weapon destroyed the Concordia, it did so by inflicting battle damage, and the ship's old age was certainly a contributing factor.

...So I guess it's just not a very sensible poll :p.
 

frostytheplebe

Seventh Part of the Seal
Gah, you're right. Of course it was battle damage. :)

I don't think age should really be a factor... supposedly by that time, there were still fighters and capships lurking from well before the WC time period still striking the fear of God into people, and lets not forget the age of the Vic, look what she accomplished.

Also, and I know I'm crossing Universes here, but in Star Trek, the second oldest class of ships still being used was the Constellation class, yet the class leader got honorable mention a couple of times in DS9. A ship that was easily over 100 years old, from a class that was mostly mothballed, was still doing great things, I think that backs up two statements:

"Carriers don't fly themselves Admiral." -Blair

and

"Just because somethings old, doesn't mean you throw it away." Geordi Laforge.

And since people like to compare it to history, heres my two cents: We lost a lot of carriers during WW2, Yorktowns, Independents, the Ben Franklin was put out of action, the Wasp, and the Lexington, however the Saratoga, the second oldest carrier still in action was a frontline fighter during most of the war, she was strickened soon after, but she held on the longest...

Why she was bombed and not turned into a museum is beyond me... if they wanted to see a carrier sink, why not the Ranger? She did nothing during the war... :mad:

(Ok rant over) :p I think old age should be taken out of the polls and "war record" should be added in. A ship that spends its carreer on the front lines is bound to live a much shorter life then one thats a 3rd rate fighter.
 

Bandit LOAF

Long Live the Confederation!
Why she was bombed and not turned into a museum is beyond me... if they wanted to see a carrier sink, why not the Ranger? She did nothing during the war...

Museums, particularly expensive ones, are rarely built immediately wars -- the TCS Victory is something of an oddity in this respect. In general, a nation (even a victorious one) wants to put a conflict behind it rather than immediately celebrate it. World War II seems like all glory to us generations later, but to many Americans in the immediate aftermath it was an open wound.

(In this particular case, the age of the Saratoga worked against her. She didn't meet the Navy's very specific technical standards for being worth the expense of surplusing... and so ended up fodder for the Crossroads tests. Which was perhaps slightly more noble than being broken up for scrap.)
 

frostytheplebe

Seventh Part of the Seal
Museums, particularly expensive ones, are rarely built immediately wars -- the TCS Victory is something of an oddity in this respect. In general, a nation (even a victorious one) wants to put a conflict behind it rather than immediately celebrate it. World War II seems like all glory to us generations later, but to many Americans in the immediate aftermath it was an open wound.

(In this particular case, the age of the Saratoga worked against her. She didn't meet the Navy's very specific technical standards for being worth the expense of surplusing... and so ended up fodder for the Crossroads tests. Which was perhaps slightly more noble than being broken up for scrap.)

True enough, but what about the Texas? She was turned into a museum immediately following her retirement.

PS- I would just like to say that the fact that the Vietnam war memorial in Washington is older then the WW2 Memorial is a travesty.
 
I agree with that earlier statement about open wounds. Both of my grandfathers fought in that war and they still don't like to talk about it.
 

Quarto

Unknown Enemy
I don't think age should really be a factor... supposedly by that time, there were still fighters and capships lurking from well before the WC time period still striking the fear of God into people, and lets not forget the age of the Vic, look what she accomplished.
In the specific case of the Concordia, we know age (or rather, the amount of battle damage accumulated over the years) was a factor - the Armada manual specifically states that the ship had been taken off the frontlines and assigned to patrolling "safe" sectors of space because it was getting "rickety" after years of fighting.
 
Top