NES Classic, SNES Classic, Playstation Classic . . . PC Classic?

Shaggy

Vice Admiral
From what it sounds like it wouldn't be quite as limited as the SNES Classic, because it looks like they're using SD Cards for the games. If that's the case then by all means give me all the WC games.
 

Pedro

Vice Admiral
From what it sounds like it wouldn't be quite as limited as the SNES Classic, because it looks like they're using SD Cards for the games. If that's the case then by all means give me all the WC games.
To be fair the SNES classic has enough inbuilt memory to upload a tonne of extra games, and its plug and play to do so. I assume there's no legal issue if you own the game already? The Wing Commander games do work on it.

That said I do think it was crazy of Nintendo not to sell additional cartridges for it - an extra 10 games a pop in a cute micro catridge? I bet they'd have sold a bucket load. I bet you'd have even seen 3rd party original titles getting produced.

As for the PC classic... argh I don't know. It looks a bit cheap, cheaper than any PC I ever owned, and whilst the XBox pad support is welcome I'd have liked to have seen an old school joystick. Collectors are willing to invest in these specialist items. It would also be excellent if they made custom shaped cases for the SD cards, like floppy disks and CDs jewel cases.
 

ChrisReid

Super Soaker Collector / Administrator
That said I do think it was crazy of Nintendo not to sell additional cartridges for it - an extra 10 games a pop in a cute micro catridge? I bet they'd have sold a bucket load. I bet you'd have even seen 3rd party original titles getting produced.
I think it's a selling point that there are no cartridges to buy. It's just simple plug and play. And it's clear they also misjudged demand and didn't make enough to begin with. If you add cartridges and add-on games to the mix, I think there's a good chance people would get burned out on it. At that point, it's just another game system, and how many times has Nintendo already re-sold us its greatest hits catalog on newer systems? (Yet... for all the billion ways you can buy the same Mario game, sometimes they screw up and don't have that available, like on the Switch).

As for the PC classic... argh I don't know. It looks a bit cheap, cheaper than any PC I ever owned, and whilst the XBox pad support is welcome I'd have liked to have seen an old school joystick. Collectors are willing to invest in these specialist items. It would also be excellent if they made custom shaped cases for the SD cards, like floppy disks and CDs jewel cases.
In this case, I just don't see the point. For $150 you can buy a perfectly capable micro computer today that can just run things from GOG. This product already exists in a ton of flavors by a ton of manufacturers. It seems doubtful that they will be able to satisfy people with the lineup of games that makes it compelling.
 

Worf

Vice Admiral
Yeah. The NES/SNES/PS Classic sell because you can't (legally) play those games without trying to acquire one of those old consoles and games. Which for some games and consoles can be difficult, or require a bit of work (e.g. console doesn't work and needs repair). These work because you pick it up, hook it to your TV and you're playing in 5 minutes.

The PC classic I don't understand - most of the games already can be played on any decent modern PC, and places like GOG make it super easy to play (install and run). You're not gaining much since today's hardware can run yesterday's games, be it natively on Windows already, or through something like DOSBox. You don't have to go out and buy a retro PC to play them (you could, but it's optional), so I really don't see the point. Plus, the control schemes - joypad, keyboard, mouse, etc?

The point is that NES/SNES/PS Classic work because finding hardware and the games are harder. The PC Classic doesn't because well, the games can still run.

Even the C64 Mini has potential because it's not as easy to find working Commodore 64s these days (the vast majority were probably put in an attic decades ago and have aged poorly, requiring restoration work).
 

Bandit LOAF

Long Live the Confederation!
I've been somewhat shocked at how far this video has spread since it's SO BADLY MADE. Who could trust a company that can't RECORD AUDIO to produce a tiny computer? I think this is a great idea and it's absolutely something that should exist... but these guys are jumping on a bandwagon they can't actually drive. (I kind of watched all this unfold; an unrelated retrogamer on Twitter started a thread about his dream 'PC Classic' that got all sorts of attention... and then immediately these guys put this video out to take advantage of the interest.)

(To be clear: this IS something that DOES exist, anyone in the world can put DOS games on a RetroPie. I think there's also a huge potential for a hobbyist version that uses a real x86 chip and that has vintage connectors... but that's not what these guys are proposing.)
 

Pedro

Vice Admiral
I think it's a selling point that there are no cartridges to buy. It's just simple plug and play. And it's clear they also misjudged demand and didn't make enough to begin with. If you add cartridges and add-on games to the mix, I think there's a good chance people would get burned out on it. At that point, it's just another game system, and how many times has Nintendo already re-sold us its greatest hits catalog on newer systems? (Yet... for all the billion ways you can buy the same Mario game, sometimes they screw up and don't have that available, like on the Switch).
I think that's great for day one, but I also think it's reduced the attractiveness of each successive release as you realize your personal favourites aren't on there (unless you are willing to hack them on which bizarrely they seem to be actively encouraging), and with the same hardware in each you quickly realise you only need the one. I moved all the famicon titles from the first mini to the SNES to avoid using two HDMI slots, I replaced the controllers with bluetooth ones. By not having catridges (or amiibos would be another way to do extra games) the novelty wore off I just came to view it as a raspberry pi with a better case. Bare in mind you wouldn't need to actually have the catridge connected long term, it could just be a way to download additional titles and then it's a collectors item to sit on a shelf (much like the amiibos quickly become).


In this case, I just don't see the point. For $150 you can buy a perfectly capable micro computer today that can just run things from GOG. This product already exists in a ton of flavors by a ton of manufacturers. It seems doubtful that they will be able to satisfy people with the lineup of games that makes it compelling.
As with your point on the SNES - its plug and play, and again the novelty. It's a cute little collectors item that is as much about having it as part of a collection as playing the titles. That said as LOAF pointed out this looks cheap and nasty, and not all that nostalgic. I didn't play with an XBox pad and I didn't insert SD cards so whilst I think it's a good idea for the nostalgic enthusiast I'm not fond of the implementation.
 
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