Beer

LeHah

212 Squadron - "The Old Man's Eyes And Ears"
I have tried Coors, Coors Light, Bud, Bud Light, Miller, Miller Light, MGD, Amber Boch, Bud Select and Bud Light Wheat... For a casual beer drinker, I think I am just about as well versed as most anyone else... However, I have tried just about all the mainstream American beers that any schmuck like me can buy at a grocery store.

"Stop beating your chest, you're going to bruise it."

45%, Basically this would taste like absolute crap I believe. The brewer made it because he was tired of all of those breweries who are trying to get the title of strongest beer...

Eh, theres a difference here. He's doing it just for the namesake. Someone like Dogfish Head or Sam Adams with their Triple Bock are doing it more for the sake of brewing, not so much the popularity of some nebulous title that no one really cares about. High APV content isn't something that attracts most people, so these things are really, really niche market stuff and thats why they tend to be available for limited amounts of time - and why I can still find bottles of the stuff collecting dust in some stores.
 

Mace

Vice Admiral
You are partially right, but the strongest beer this and that has been a race for the past few months, and I think this guy brewed it so he could get a high alcohol level in it as possible. But this is from a small brewery, and it is a light-colored beer, If I ever get the chance to drink it this spring, and survive(and remember), I'll be sure to drop a review on what it tasted like.
 

LeHah

212 Squadron - "The Old Man's Eyes And Ears"
You are partially right, but the strongest beer this and that has been a race for the past few months, and I think this guy brewed it so he could get a high alcohol level in it as possible.

You just repeated what I said.
 

Mace

Vice Admiral
Well....
Since I am from Germany I have to say (sorry to the US beers) I didn't like any american beer I tried.

My favorites
- Budvar (Which is NOT the same as Budweiser, thats a complex story)
- Pilsner Urquell (despite the german sounding name this is from the Czech Republic, too)
- Rothaus Tannenzäpfle (German beer, rather famous and from the area I live in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rothaus)
- Kilkenny (a bit better than Guiness, I think)
- Guinness (the original Irish one, of course)

All of those (except the last two) are Pilsner-beers, so they have a rather bitter taste which most americans I know don't like at all. Also some of our beers here are quite strong (5.5% alcohol or more are not that uncommon, in fact it is hard to find a beer that has less than 5%). That often creates the impression that american beers are kind of "thin" and most germans don't like them because they aren't used to that. So don't be upset when you hear "There is no (real) beer in the US" from a german. They don't want to insult you, they are just used to another kind of taste.

And as you may know: German beer is chemical free (There actually was a law for that from the year 1516 on until some years ago http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reinheitsgebot)
And a lot of germans still don't want to drink any beer that has more than those old ingredients (like, for example, most US beers), although I admit that they can taste quite good.

Is "maximilians-brauwiesen" according to "reinheitsgebot"? Because is does not go flat, you can carry a 2 litre pint of that across a festivalground and it does not go flat, as opposed to "hasseroder". We figured it was because of the use of certain chemicals.
 

Deacan

Commodore
Here in good old germany we have someting called "Schwarzer Abt", (black abbot), a very very very sweet beer (3,9%) and I like 'cause I dont get drunk so fast...
 
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